Construction Jobs

The construction industry has been hit very hard by the recession and the jobs market in this sector has been severely affected as a result but there are still jobs to be had in the industry, it's just not as easy to find them now as in the good old days because so many people are competing for them. Times are definitely hard for unskilled or inexperienced workers but the opportunities for those with proven skills, experience and good references are still there, you just have to be prepared to really look for them.

 

Not all construction jobs are actually manual in nature, some of them are almost entirely office based although if you were say a cost estimator you might still need to put on work boots and a hart hat occasionally when on site. This is an opportunity for someone with an interest in building and construction but with really good numerical and computer skills. A degree is a real advantage for this kind of occupation  as well as thorough understanding of modern construction engineering modelling software but most of all you need to be familiar with computer based budgeting software as staying financially on target can be the making oir breaking of any construction company.

 

As a professional glazier you would need to have absolutely no fear of heights as you would be constantly installing glass windows often very high up, it is a very demanding and often dangerous occupation that needs a high degree or dexterity and a thorough understanding of safe working procedures. You would have to deal with a very wide range of related tasks connected to foundation and outer building construction and be prepared to be almost constantly working on site in quite dangerous and demanding situations and environments. Not exactly everybody's ideal occupation and the pay does not reflect the high levels of danger to be expected in this occupation.

 

These days if you aren't amazingly computer savvy and you have a practical nature there are still a lot of opportunities for plumbers and many plumbers earn as much if not more than some of their office bound colleagues. Ideally a degree or at least a professional plumbing guild certification will get you on the first rung of the professional ladder, you will learn a great deal in your first few years as an apprentice  learning to read plumbing blueprints and dealing with water systems of all types as well as drainage systems. There is a national shortage of certified plumbers so it is a good trade to get into at the moment and the pay is good compared to other types of skilled manual work.

 

As an electrician, provided you are prepare to go through the four or five years of professional training required to get your certification including an apprenticeship of two or three years with on the job training, there are great opportunities for skilled workers. You have to be prepared to work in cramped and often highly dangerous conditions as there is a constant hazard of lethal electric shock but there is a demand for skilled workers and the pay can be extremely good.

 

Joiners and carpenters have to train for far less time and can make comparable wages to an electrician and that may be why so many people opt for it instead, there are always opportunities on sites and in the building trade for experienced joiners fitters and carpenters and the scale of projects you would be working on can vary enormously, depending on your preference.

There are always basic construction job vacancies but they tend to be over subscribed due to the high levels of unemployment we have these days so it is better to get a qualification in a specialised field if possible.